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Overview

The Terrestrial Sciences domain is focused on understanding and quantifying the processes and patterns that characterize the Earth's surface and near-surface environments across multiple spatio-temporal scales. We are interested in the physical, chemical and biological processes that operate at or near the Earth's surface, and our research integrates across several disciplines, such as physical geography, soil science, geomorphology, hydrology, ecology, geology, and biogeosciences. To address research problems, we use an interdisciplinary toolkit that integrates remotely-sensed data, field observations, small-scale physical experiments, and numerical models. Our research has strong links with other research domains within our department, such as ocean sciences and atmospheric and climate sciences, and also other departments across campus.

 Affiliated Faculty

Professor
Professor Caylor studies the interactions between water, vegetation, and society across the world’s drylands.
Assistant Professor
Remote sensing and field observations to study Arctic hydrologic systems in a changing climate.
Assistant Professor
Mechanics of landscape evolution in modern and ancient times.
Professor
I am a biogeochemist. I investigate natural and anthropogenic processes that influence patterns of element cycling in terrestrial ecosystems.
Professor
My research and teaching both focus on Hydrology & Water Resources Systems.
Associate Professor
Vegetation–atmosphere interactions, urban climate, urban ecology, remote sensing, carbon cycle, water and energy budgets.
Professor
I use remote sensing to study environmental problems using sensors that cover the entire electromagnetic spectrum.
Assistant Professor
How changes in climate and water availability affect ecosystem diversity, productivity, and resilience across large spatial scales.
Professor
Coastal and aeolian (windblown) geomorphology, beaches, dunes, coastal erosion, sediment transport, geoarchaeology.