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UC Santa Barbara
Department of Geography
UC Santa Barbara
Department of Geography

UC Santa Barbara Geography / Courses /

Geog 200A: Introduction to Geographic Research, 2.0 - Staff
Notes: Required of all geography graduate students. Normally taken in fall quarter of entering academic year. Lecture, 2 hours.

Presentation and discussion by department faculty of research areas in the department. Systematic and technique areas of emphasis will be presented, as well as department facilities and research collaborations with other institutions.

Geog 200B: Introduction to Geographic Research, 4.0 - Staff
Prerequisites: Geography 200A or approval of Graduate Committee.
Notes: Required of all geography graduate students. Normally taken in winter quarter of entering academic year. Seminar, 3 hours.

Fundamental issues of research in geography and related areas: the geographic perspective, scientific reading/writing and problem formulation, research techniques, the scientific enterprise, and science and society.

Geog 200C: Introduction to Geographic Research, 2.0 - Staff
Prerequisites: Geography 200A or approval of Graduate Committee; and Geography 200B.
Notes: Required of all geography graduate students. Normally taken in spring quarter of entering academic year. Seminar, Tutorial, 2 hours.

Directed readings and research leading to a draft thesis proposal (MA students) or a systematic literature review in prospective dissertation area (Ph.D. students); participation in seminars discussing ongoing graduate research.

Geog 201: Seminar in Geography, 2.0 - Staff
Notes: Required of all geography graduate students every quarter offered. Seminar, 3 hours.

A series of seminars on diverse problems in human and physical geography, and geographic techniques, by current and visiting faculty and researchers.

Geog 201Q: Quantitative Methods in the Social Sciences Colloquium, 2.0 - Sweeney
Notes: Same course as Sociology 212Q, PSTAT 250, and ED 212. May be repeated for credit. Lecture, 2 hours.

Required course for students in the Interdisciplinary Quantitative Methods in the Social Sciences emphasis.

Geog 202A: Remote Sensing and Environmental Optics, 5.0 - Roberts
Prerequisites: Geography 115A.
Notes: Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory 3 hours.

Principles of radiation emission; radiative transfer equation and some solution methods; surface interactions; instrumentation; applications to remote sensing and energy budgets in atmosphere, ocean, and other media.

Geog 208: Water Resource Systems Analysis, 4.0 - Loaiciga
Recommended preparation: Geography 112 and 116; upper-division calculus and statistics; computer programming or object-oriented programming desired (Matlab, Mathematica, Excel).
Notes: Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory 2 hours.

Quantitative methods (operations research, applied mathematics and statistics, numerical simulation) are used to analyze and synthesize complex water resources systems. Topics include economic analysis, hydropower, flood control, groundwater management, and reservoirs.

Geog 209: Pedology, 4.0 - Chadwick
Prerequisites: Concurrent enrollment in Geography 209L.
Notes: Lecture, 3 hours.

A process-based quantitative study of soil development as driving variables of climate, biota, lithology, topography and geologic time. Emphasis on interactions among soil and other earth system components: atmosphere, lithosphere, biosphere, hydrosphere.

Geog 209L: Pedology Lab, 1.0 - Chadwick
Prerequisites: Concurrent enrollment in Geography 209.
Notes: Laboratory, 3 hours.

Independent projects that include field site selection, soil description, sampling, laboratory preparation of soil samples, and chemical and physical analysis designed to resolve specific hypotheses.

Geog 210A: Analytical Methods in Geography I, 4.0 - Siegel
Prerequisites: Geography 172-172L or equivalents.
Notes: Lecture, 3 hours; discussion, 1 hour.

Introduction to analytical methods for geography research. Topics include: calculus, differential equations and linear algebra. Emphasis is placed on solving geographically relevant problems and their documentation.

Geog 210B: Analytical Methods in Geography II, 4.0 - Michaelsen
Prerequisites: Geography 210A.
Notes: Not open for credit to students who have completed Geography 206. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 2 hour.

Statistical principles and practice of analyzing geographical data. Topics include bivariate and multiple regression and other multivariate techniques. Emphasis on exploratory data analysis and graphical techniques.

Geog 210C: Analytical Methods in Geography III, 4.0 - Kyriakidis
Prerequisites: Geography 210B.
Notes: Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 2 hours.

Overview of key concepts in spatial statistics, including measures of spatial association and models for spatial regression, point processes and random fields. Geostatistical methods for analysis and interpolating continuous and area (lattice) data.

Geog 211A: Transportation Planning & Modeling, 5.0 - Goulias
Prerequisites: Introductory probability and statistics.
Notes: Lecture, 3 hours; discussion, 2 hours.

Issues, problems, technologies, policies, plans, and the transportation-environment relationship. Transportation systems simulation, data collection and model building. Applications in planning, design, and operations. Lab: Critically examine transportation plans and programs and explore travel surveys.

Geog 211B: Transportation Modeling & Simulation, 5.0 - Goulias
Prerequisites: Geography 211A.
Recommended preparation: Geography 210B-C or equivalent.
Notes: Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 2 hours.

Transportation data collection, travel survey design. Revealed and stated choice data and their collection in laboratory and field studies. Regression models and systems simulation. Applications in policy planning and operations. Lab: Data analysis, model development, testing in typical regional simulation.

Geog 211C: Activity and Travel Behavior Analysis, 4.0 - Goulias
Prerequisites: Geography 211B.
Recommended preparation: Geography 210C or equivalent.
Notes: Seminar, 3 hours.

Time-use, activity analysis, and travel behavior in space, time, and social context. Cross-sectional and longitudinal data collection and analysis with emphasis on using time, travel, technology, information, and telecommunication. Applications using simultaneous equations, multilevel, latent class, and structural equations models.

Geog 214A: Advanced Remote Sensing: Passive, 5.0 - Roberts
Recommended preparation: At least one prior course in remote sensing advised.
Notes: Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 2 hours.

Passive remote sensing (VIS/NIR,Thermal microwave). Discussion of advanced sensors, techniques, modeling, and applications in each spectral region. Includes computer-based laboratory exercises. A final paper and oral presentation of a research project using remote sensing is required.

Geog 214B: Advanced Remote Sensing: Active, 5.0 - Roberts
Recommended preparation: At least one prior course in remote sensing advised.
Notes: Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 2 hours.

Discusses advanced sensors, techniques, modeling, and applications of active remote sensing including Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) and Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR). Includes computer-based laboratory exercises. Final paper and oral presentation of research project using remote sensing is required.

Geog 217: Scientific Research Methods in Geography, 4.0 - Montello
Notes: Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 1 hour.

Introduction to scientific research methods in human, physical, and techniques geography. Topics include: scientific logic and philosophy, physical measurement, surveys, experimental and nonexperimental research designs, computational modeling, sampling, data analysis and display, written and oral communication, and research ethics.

Geog 224: Methods of Regional Analysis, 4.0 - Sweeney
Prerequisites: Geography 108 and 185B.
Notes: Seminar, 3 hours; laboratory, 1 hour.

Seminar focusing on advanced methods of regional economic and population analysis. Topics vary but may include one or more of the following: multi-regional projection, stochastic population forecasts, I-O analysis, and/or regional econometric models.

Geog 225: Urban Problems, 4.0 - Couclelis
Recommended preparation: Geography 108 and 153B.
Notes: Seminar, 3 hours.

Detailed studies of selected social, economic, and physical problems related to modern cities.

Geog 229: Environmental Perception and Cognition, 4.0 - Couclelis, Montello
Prerequisites: Graduate standing.
Notes: Lecture, 3 hours.

Theories and methods related to acquiring, representing, and analyzing knowledge of complex large-scale environments.

Geog 230: Behavioral Geography, 4.0 - Couclelis, Montello
Recommended preparation: Geography 153A and/or 153C.
Notes: Seminar, 3 hours.

Survey of behavioral approaches in a variety of areas of geography.

Geog 231: Cognitive Issues in Geographic Information Science, 4.0 - Couclelis, Montello, Raubal
Notes: Seminar, 3 hours.

Theory and research on cognitive issues in geographic information science. Perception, memory, reasoning, communication, human factors in digital worlds.

Geog 232: Cartographic Transformations, 4.0 - Clarke
Prerequisites: Mathematics 3A or 34A.
Notes: Seminar, 3 hours.

Classical map projections; cartograms; empirical "rubber sheeting"; bidimensional regression. The geometry of geography: geodesics; geographical circles; the distortion tensor; nonsymmetric distances.

Geog 237: Quantitative Geomorphology, 5.0 - Bookhagen
Prerequisites: Geography 3B or Earth Science 2; or equivalent
Recommended preparation: Upper-division calculus; computer programming or object-oriented programming desired (MATLAB, Python)
Notes: Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 2 hours.

Basic quantitative understanding of processes shaping the Earth's surface. In-depth evaluations of hill slope diffusion, mass wasting, and fluvial processes. Applications of quantitative methods are emphasized throughout the class. Laboratory provides an understanding of isotopic, physical, and remote sensing dataset. (Fall)

Geog 241A: Population Geography, 4.0 - Carr
Notes: Not open for credit to students who have completed Geography 241. Lecture, 3 hours.

Advanced substantive investigation of the geography of human population. The geographical dimensions of fertility, mortality and migration are explored. Important recent and classic demographic literature is reviewed.

Geog 241B: Population, Development, and the Environment, 4.0 - Sweeney, Carr
Notes: Lecture, 3 hours.

Exploration of global and regional patterns of demographic change especially as they relate to significant economic development or environmental issues. Course readings are selected to provide a broad overview of current research frontiers in addition to classic readings.

Geog 241C: Spatial Demography, 4.0 - Sweeney
Prerequisites: Geography 210A, 210B, and 210C or equivalent.
Notes: Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 1 hour.

An introduction to mathematical and statistical demography. Primary emphasis is on spatially-explicit methods: multiregional life tables, multiregional projection, spatial statistics/econometrics applied to population, and life course analysis of migration. Matlab and SAS are used for applications.

Geog 242: Land Use - Land Cover Change, 4.0 - McFadden
Notes: Seminar, 3 hours.

Examines land use-land cover changes across ecosystems. Theoretical and methodological challenges to linking biophysical, socio-economic, and remote sensing/GIS analysis. Seminar includes review of current literature focusing on detection and monitoring, driving forces, and impacts of land modifications.

Geog 246: Earth System Science: Hydrologic Modeling, 4.0 - Loaiciga
Recommended preparation: Geography 112 and 116; upper-division calculus and statistics; computer or object-oriented programming desired (Matlab, Excel).
Notes: Lecture, 3 hours; Laboratory, 2 hours.

Quantitative and computational study of land-atmosphere hydrologic interactions; modeling of surface water and groundwater processes, regional groundwater systems and solute transport.

Geog 253: Global Warming: Causes and Consequences, 4.0 - Gautier
Prerequisites: Geography 134.
Notes: Lecture, 3 hours.

Physical processes involved in global warming: carbon dioxide increase and uptake; role of clouds, oceans and biosphere; consequences: sea level changes, hydrological cycle intensification, etc. Climate modeling and predictions.

Geog 255: Geography of Latin America, 4.0 - Carr
Notes: Lecture, 3 hours.

Graduate seminar supplements Geography 155 with further exploration of primary texts probing historical and spatial patterns of society, politics, and demographics with emphasis on human-environment interactions. Students discuss assigned reading and present in class, and write a term paper.

Geog 261: Ocean Optics, 4.0 - Dickey, Siegel
Notes: Lecture, 3 hours.

An examination of the optical properties and radiative transfers in natural waters. Applications discussed include modeling of solar radiation penetration, relectance and transmittance at the air-sea interface, and ocean color remote sensing.

Geog 262: Upper Ocean Physical Processes, 4.0 - Siegel, Washburn
Prerequisites: Geography 263.
Notes: May be repeated for credit with changes in content and methods. Lecture, 3 hours.

Detailed studies of upper ocean dynamics and physical processes. Topics may include mesoscale dynamics, mixed layer modeling, radiative transfer, turbulent mixing processes, and internal waves.

Geog 263: Introduction to Physical Oceanography, 4.0 - Dickey, Siegel, Washburn
Notes: Lecture, 3 hours.

A graduate-level introduction to physical oceanography. Topics discussed include: properties of sea water, derivation and application of the equations of motion for a rotating planet, and the dynamics of wind- and buoyancy-driven general circulation.

Geog 264: Seminar in Oceanography, 2.0 - Dickey, Siegel, Washburn
Prerequisites: Geography 163 or 263; and, Geography 265.
Notes: Seminar, 2 hours.

Graduate seminar in physical, optical, and biological oceanography.

Geog 266: Introduction to Atmospheric Sciences, 4.0 - Michaelsen
Notes: Lecture, 3 hours.

Fundamentals in atmospheric processes that are important for understanding the role of the atmosphere in earthís climate and biogeochemistry. Graduate-level introduction to radiation, dynamics, clouds, chemistry, and how they interact.

Geog 275: Seminar in Geographical Information Systems, 4.0 - Goodchild
Notes: Seminar, 3 hours.

Study of current trends in geographically oriented information processing systems.

Geog 276: Geographical Time Series Analysis, 3.0 - Washburn
Prerequisites: Geography 172.
Notes: Not available for credit to students who have completed Geography 276B. Lecture, 3 hours.

Introduction to time series analysis in geography. Topics include spatial and temporal sampling, fast Fourier transform techniques, linear systems, and digital filtering.

Geog 277: Spatial Environmental Modeling, 4.0 - Roberts
Prerequisites: Consent of instructor.
Notes: May be repeated for credit provided topics are different. Seminar, 3 hours.

Seminar covering topics in spatial environmental modeling. Integrates techniques such as remote sensing and GIS into modeling of spatial processes. Topics include biogeochemical cycles, hydrology, species distribution and habitat disturbance.

Geog 278: Practice of Geostatistical Modeling of Spatial Data, 5.0 - Kyriakidis
Prerequisites: Geography 172 or equivalent, and Geography 274.
Notes: Not available for credit to students who have completed Geography 276A. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 2 hours.

Practice of geostatistics on large environmental data sets using MATLAB. Methods for modeling spatial patterns, integrating spatial data across multiple spatial scales, and simulating complex spatial distributions.

Geog 279: Seminar in Geostatistics: Advanced Topics in Spatial Statistics, 3.0 - Kyriadkidis
Prerequisites: Geography 278 or equivalent.
Notes: Not available for credit to students who have completed Geography 276C. May be repeated for credit. Seminar, 3 hours.

Research frontiers in geostatistics, and innovative application of spatial statistics to the analysis of geographical data.

Geog 280: Seminar on Climate Change, 2.0-4.0 - Gautier, Michaelson, Siegel
Notes: Seminar, 3 hours.

A series of lectures and seminars on diverse research topics on climate change.

Geog 281A: GIScience Research, 4.0 - Clarke, Raubal
Notes: Seminar, 2 hours; laboratory, 2 hours.

Introduction to GIScience as an academic research field, conducted through review, discussion, and presentation of seminal works from leading journals. Labs reinforce and develop students' existing techniques on problems of research-level difficulty in spatial analysis, cognition and mobile GIS.

Geog 281B: GIScience Studies, 4.0 - Clarke, Raubal
Notes: Seminar, 2 hours; laboratory, 2 hours.

Builds on previous course through in-depth examination of topics chosen by interests of leading professor. Labs emphasize development of advanced spatial analytical skills, cutting edge visualization techniques, and spatio-temporal modeling. Course concludes with an individual GIScience project.

Geog 288AA-ZZ: Special Topics in Geography, 2.0-4.0 - Staff
Notes: Seminar, variable hours.

Geographic curriculum content that lies outside regularly scheduled courses. New classes under development or taught temporarily. Course number-letter combination reflects instructor. Content varies.

Geog 291: Optimization Models for Geographic Problems, 4.0 - Church
Prerequisites: Mathematics 3A or 5A or 34A.
Notes: Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 2 hours.

Survey of advanced optimization techniques with applications to geographical problems. Methods include advanced topics in linear programming, dynamic programming, integer programming, networks, and queuing.

Geog 294: Advanced Topics in Location and Transportation Systems, 4.0 - Church
Prerequisites: Geography 190 or 191 or 291.
Notes: May be repeated for credit with changes in content, methods, and applications areas examined. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory 1 hour.

Study of current research and application of systems models in the analysis, design, operation, and scheduling of transport and location problems.

Geog 295: Advanced Topics in Pedology, 4.0 - Chadwick
Prerequisites: Geography 209.
Notes: May be repeated for credit with changes in content, methods, and applications areas examined. Seminar, 3 hours.

Intensive reading and discussions of current topics in soil-geomorphology, soil-geochemistry, and quantitative modeling of soil processes.

Geog 295A: Soils and Ecosystems, 3.0 - Chadwick, Schimel
Notes: Same course as EEMB 295A. Seminar, 3 hours.

Development of the links between the biological and inorganic components of the soil. Water availability and nutrients control plant and soil microbial communities. These in turn affect the soil by enhancing weathering and modifying the local environment.

Geog 500: Teaching Assistant Training, 4.0 - Staff
Notes: May be repeated for credit. Seminar, 2 hours; laboratory, 1 hour.

Compulsory course for new teaching assistants to examine geographic teaching methods. Emphasis on use of special equipment and facilities in the department, teaching aids, examination preparation and grading, student advising, and special problems.

Geog 596: Directed Reading and Research, 2.0-8.0 - Staff
Prerequisites: Consent of instructor and department.
Notes: No more than half the graduate units necessary for the masterís degree may be taken in Geography 596. Preparation, 2-8 hours.

Individual tutorial. Instructor is usually studentís major professor.

Geog 597: Individual Study for Ph.D. Examinations, 1.0-12.0 - Staff
Prerequisites: Consent of instructor and graduate advisor.
Notes: S/U grade. Maximum of 12 units per quarter; enrollment limited to 24 units total. Variable hours.

Instructor should be studentís major professor or chair of the doctoral committee.

Geog 598: Masterís Thesis Research and Preparation, 1.0-12.0 - Staff
Prerequisites: Consent of instructor and graduate advisor.
Notes: S/U grading. Preparation, 1-12 hours.

Research toward and writing of thesis.

Geog 599: Ph.D. Dissertation Research and Preparation, 1.0-12.0 - Staff
Prerequisites: Consent of instructor and graduate advisor.
Notes: S/U grading. Preparation, 1-12 hours.

Research toward and writing of dissertation. Instructor should be chair of studentís doctoral committee.

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